Dismantling the Spangled Bed – Part 2

Last week we looked at the first stage of dismantling the Spangled Bed here at Knole. This involved dealing with the textile elements of the bed ready for wooden frame to be taken apart.

 

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This is what the bed looked like with all of the textiles removed. As you can see the conservators were not able to remove the textile from the bed posts themselves or the tester (the top of the bed). This can be done at a later stage.

In order to remove the tester from the bed we needed to set up two scaffold towers either side of the bed and rest a platform between them to support the tester after it was removed from the posts.

The bed is constructed using simple pegs and so there was no need to remove glue or any other adhesives. It was a straightforward matter to lift the tester up off the four posts. Four people then supported the tester while furniture conservators used mallets to disengage the posts and slide them safely to the ground.

All we had to do now was lower the tester down to the floor and the bed would be gone. The whole process of getting the bed from this….

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…to this…

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The top of the tester showing the years of dust that had built up.

…took no more than half an hour. Amazing what you can do with a little planning and teamwork!

So now the bed is down and everything is ready to be sent off for specialist conservation.

It’s worth remembering that during the deconstruction of the bed the documentation and recording of the process and different pieces was meticulous. It is so important with historic furniture like this that we know exactly where each and every thing came from. As each part of the bed was removed it was properly labelled so that we could keep a careful track during its various travels.

We’re looking forward to seeing the bed in when it comes back from conservation. Until then we’ll keep you up to date with all the exciting happenings here at Knole!

Knole Conservation Team

Dismantling the Spangled Bed – Part 1

July was a busy and exciting time at Knole. After long a long period of preparation the day finally came when we dismantled the glorious Spangled Bed at Knole. This is one of the three state beds here along with the James II Bed and the King’s Bed. The textiles of the bed date back to the 1620s, roughly 50-60 years older than the other beds. Our first record of the bed at Knole is in 1706 after it came down from Copt Hall (another family house) along with a lot of other furniture.

 The significance of the bed continues to grow as we learn more and more about its origins and construction. As part of our ongoing conservation work the bed has now been taken apart and waiting to be taken away for treatment that will likely take about 2 years.

 Considering this bed has not been dismantled for centuries we needed to plan everything very carefully before we acted. The first stage involved conservators from the National Trust Textile Studio at Blickling removing the hangings and other textile elements to be packed ready to for transport.

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Halfway through the packing process on the Great Hall dais

This involved the construction of bespoke boxes to houses each item safely and securely for their journey. The two mattresses from the bed have been stored safely at Knole whilst the rest of the textiles have been packed and can be seen on the dais of the Great Hall right now.

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Piece of the spangled textile wrapped in acid-free tissue.

The first three days of our bed week were all about the textiles. Once the mattress and textiles had been removed it was time to start thinking about dismantling the woodwork. Look out next week for part two of the Spangled Bed story!

Knole Conservation Team

Revealing the Cartoons

Earlier this year, back in May, we commissioned some cleaning tests to be carried out on one of the Raphael cartoon copies in the Cartoon Gallery – Elymas the Sorcerer.

The tests were carried out to enable us to understand better the conservation needs of the paintings. The test will give us a much clearer idea of how long the cleaning of the whole Cartoon will take, what materials will be needed and what can be achieved by the conservation.

Solvents were used on cotton wool swabs – this removed the outer varnish layer, a layer of dirt under this and also poor quality retouching. The layers of grime and dirt that came off can be seen in the below photo. After cleaning, the patch was re-varnished with a matt varnish to protect the surface.

 

Dirty swabs from the cartoon cleaning

Dirty cotton wool swabs from the cartoon cleaning

The results are fantastic. For years it has been increasingly hard to read the underlying painting. The following images show just how much detail will be revealed by cleaning which has to be done with extreme care on the unstable cracked paint surface – for example, an area of 2.5 square feet took over 3 hours to clean. When the time comes to clean the Cartoons in their entirety, the surface will have to be consolidated and the paintings lined beforehand.

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Alongside the conservation we’ve been looking more closely at the history of the Knole Cartoons. The original Raphael Cartoons were commissioned by Pope Leo X in 1515. Painted by Raphael (1483-1520) and his assistants, they are full-scale designs for tapestries that were made to cover the lower walls of the Vatican’s Sistine Chapel. The tapestries depict the Acts of St Peter and St Paul.

 We don’t know the exact sequence and commissioning process of the Knole cartoons as we haven’t yet found them in the accounts of Copt Hall – another Sackville house, sold in 1701 when all the contents were removed to Knole. Our set is unusual because of its size. The original cartoons – the ones the weavers used to create the tapestries and which are now reassembled from cut strips and were originally displayed at Hampton Court (now moved to the V&A) – are much larger than the ones at Knole. It is possible that calling our paintings “cartoons” is misleading because it may be that they were intended as paintings for an interior in the manner of the originals. Hopefully we may find an answer when we look more closely at the archives.

Helen

Reinstating a Grotesque

If long-time readers of this blog cast their minds back they may recall that in November of 2012 paintings conservators came to Knole to remove and restore some of the grotesque paintings in the Cartoon Gallery.

After two and a half years of being away the last and largest grotesque has finally returned and has been reinstated on the south wall of the gallery.

 

The largest piece of canvas just after it was removed. Considerable damage and unsympathetic repairs resulted in the jigsaw effect you see here.

The largest piece of canvas just after it was removed. Considerable damage and unsympathetic repairs resulted in the jigsaw effect you see here.

 

 

Voila! The conserved grotesque back at Knole and ready to go up on the wall!

Voila! The conserved grotesque back at Knole and ready to go up on the wall!

The grotesque has been the subject of intense restoration work since it left Knole. The original vibrant colours have been brought back and the patches blended beautifully with the main canvas to recreate the piece of art that had been lost for so long. The canvas has been mounted on a special polyester sailcloth lining in order to give further protection to the canvas. It’s now ready to be reattached to bare wood panelling.

 But first!

There are a few more things we need to do before we can mount the canvas. In order to gain access to the wood panelling we needed to take down the magnificent pier glass mirror that hangs there.

 After building our scaffold tower and carefully bringing down this (rather heavy) mirror we noticed a certain amount of woodworm damage in both the panel and the mirror itself. This is not particularly surprising given the prevalence of woodworm and all sorts of other creepy crawlies throughout the house!

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Some tunnels left by hungry furniture beetle (woodworm) in the panels behind the grotesque.

We carefully brushed the excess dirt and frass (wood dust and woodworm excrement) into vacuums before applying a light coating of ‘Constrain’ insecticide. After leaving this for an hour to dry we returned to find it still a little damp. As we needed to get the job done by the end of the day we decided we would help it dry a little faster!

Sarah using a hairdryer to gently dry the Constrain solution.

Sarah using a hairdryer to gently dry the Constrain solution.

Now we’re ready to reinstate the grotesque!

Siobhan (our outgoing Project Conservator and incoming Conservation Studio Manager) and Martha (our incoming Project Conservator) lifting the grotesque into its old home.

Siobhan (our outgoing Project Conservator and incoming Conservation Studio Manager) and Martha (our incoming Project Conservator) lifting the grotesque into its old home.

Home again at last!

Home again at last!

Back home and looking fabulous once again!

Knole Conservation Team

Clandon Park: the Speakers’ Parlour

NTKnole:

Clandon’s lone survivor.

Originally posted on Treasure Hunt:

The Speakers' Parlour at Clandon Park following the fire, showing the carpet being removed. Also visible is a large frame from which a portrait painting was cut, in anticipation of the fire reaching this room, which fortunately didn't happen. ©National Trust The Speakers’ Parlour at Clandon Park following the fire, showing the carpet being removed. Also visible is a large frame from which a portrait painting was cut, in anticipation of the fire reaching this room, which fortunately didn’t happen. ©National Trust

It has just been confirmed that the Speakers’ Parlour at Clandon was not damaged as severely in the recent fire as many of the other areas of the house.

The ceiling of the Speakers' Parlour propped up, and the chandelier removed. ©National Trust The ceiling of the Speakers’ Parlour propped up, and the chandelier removed. ©National Trust

This family dining room was named after the portraits hanging there of the three members of the Onslow family who were Speakers of the House of Commons: Richard Onslow (1528-71, ‘the Black Speaker’), Sir Richard Onslow, 3rd Bt and 1st Baron Onslow (1654-1717), and Arthur Onslow (1691-1768, ‘the Great Speaker’).

View of the west front, showing the remains of the ground floor Saloon. The Giacomo Leoni-designed chimneypiece, with its overmantel relief of Mars and Venus, is visible through the second window from the left. ©National Trust View of the west front, showing the remains of the ground floor Saloon. The Giacomo Leoni-designed…

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Summer’s here…nearly

After a long, cold winter the conservation team are taking every sunny opportunity to get out and do some of our more pleasant outdoor jobs. For those of you that don’t know Knole well we have a portion of our collection outside exposed to the elements 365 days a year. This includes a pair of prehistoric elk antlers that measure 7 foot from tip to tip, a lead fish tank and a considerably array of busts and other statuary.

When the winter is finished battering our poor outdoor objects we swoop in at the first sign of a sunny day to give them some tender loving care. Our first mission (as always) is to give everything a good dust and clean. We work our way along the loggia making sure that every piece is carefully dusted. You’d be amazed at the amount of dust a pair of antlers can hold onto over a year!

Cleaning elk and waxing Romans.

Cleaning elk and waxing Romans.

Some of the busts in particular have fallen foul of pigeons over the last year so we have been very carefully cleaning off their droppings where we find them!

For the antlers, this is all the help they get. Once they have been de-cobwebbed and dusted we leave them alone. Step two for the busts and lead work in Stone Court and Green Court is to provide some kind of protection against the elements. We do this by applying a thin layer of microcrystalline wax polish developed by the British Museum which protects and damp and dust. Long-time readers of the Knole conservation team blog may know that this is something that we regularly use inside the house as well as out. It provides a protective barrier layer and can be applied to almost any surface! We make sure we get into every nook and cranny on the detailed statues ensuring they have the best possible protection. With the application of this wonder substance we’re done!

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Knole Conservation Team

Our Favourite Objects – Part 10!

The latest entry in our favourite objects series is from Hannah who is one of our wonderful conservation volunteers here in the house. Keep reading to find out what she thinks is best about Knole!

As Knole is such a big and beautiful house full to the brim of interesting objects the idea of choosing one favourite piece presented a difficult task, one which I tried to approach from a variety of angles. I looked for the most grand object, the oldest, the biggest, the most expensive, the most detailed etc. (the list goes on). Over my month of work experience back in 2013 my favourite object changed from week to week – from the portrait of Frances Cranfield hanging in the ballroom, to the stunning silverware in the King’s Room, to the royal bed in the Venetian Ambassador’s Room; and yet, there was something about each of these objects that did not quite stick.

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He was once Vita Sackville-West’s bedroom doorstop!

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Shakespeare at home at the bottom of the Great Stairs

 

 

 

 

 Every time I walked through to the Great Staircase however, my eye was caught by this funny little wooden doorstop, carved in the form of William Shakespeare. I was intrigued by its quirky appearance and when I finally got up close and saw the sentimental quote, ‘We shall never look upon his like again’ carved into a scroll in his hand, I was sold. I still look at him fondly whenever I walk through that part of the house and if there was ever a fire he is the first thing I would save. 

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‘We shall never see his like again’ inscribed on Shakespeare’s scroll

 

He is not particularly grand, large or detailed but he is unique and will always hold a special place in my heart. To me he represents a love of literature and a tribute to those who create wonderful worlds for the rest of us to get lost in. As it turns out, choosing a favourite wasn’t such a difficult task after all.

Hannah